Designing for Children's Collective Music Making: How Spatial Orientation and Configuration Matter

Publication: Research - peer-reviewArticle in proceedings

DOI

Hitmachine empowers children to make music through building physical, shared interactive instruments from Lego MindstormsTM and playing them to a beat. The design rationale for Hitmachine draws upon the collective interaction model, theories of proxemics and F-formations, as well as a framework for social interaction. Hitmachine was evaluated during a 4-day workshop where 150 children aged 3-13 engaged with the system. Based on lessons from this workshop we point to key issues to consider when designing for collective music making. This includes designing for multiple access points and spatial orientation of these, designing for sense of impact as well as sense of control, and giving careful consideration to how the spatial configuration of technological artifacts and furniture can provide opportunities for social interaction.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNordiCHI '16 Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
EditorsWolmet Barendregt, Mohammad Obaid
Number of pages10
Place of PublicationNew York, NY
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Publication year2016
Article number60
ISBN (print)978-1-4503-4763-1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
EventProceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Gothenburg, Sweden

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
LandSweden
ByGothenburg
Periode23/10/201627/10/2016
SeriesNordiCHI '16: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction

    Keywords

  • Tangible music, Collective interaction, Proxemics

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 107772150