Species traits as drivers of food web structure

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

DOI

  • Idaline Laigle
    Idaline LaigleQuebec Ctr Biodivers Sci
  • Isabelle Aubin
    Isabelle AubinNat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Ctr, Canadian Forest Serv
  • Christoph Digel
    Christoph DigelGeorg August Univ Gottingen, University of Gottingen, JF Blumenbach Inst Zool & Anthropol
  • Ulrich Brose
    Ulrich BroseGerman Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv
  • Isabelle Boulangeat
    Isabelle Boulangeat
  • Dominique Gravel
    Dominique GravelQuebec Ctr Biodivers Sci

The use of functional traits to describe community structure is a promising approach to reveal generalities across organisms and ecosystems. Plant ecologists have demonstrated the importance of traits in explaining community structure, competitive interactions as well as ecosystem functioning. The application of trait-based methods to more complex communities such as food webs is however more challenging owing to the diversity of animal characteristics and of interactions. The objective of this study was to determine how functional structure is related to food web structure. We consider that food web structure is the result of 1) the match between consumer and resource traits, which determine the occurence of a trophic interaction between them, and 2) the distribution of functional traits in the community. We implemented a statistical approach to assess whether or not 35 466 pairwise interactions between soil organisms are constrained by trait-matching and then used a Procrustes analysis to investigate correlations between functional indices and network properties across 48 sites. We found that the occurrence of trophic interactions is well predicted by matching the traits of the resource with those of the consumer. Taxonomy and body mass of both species were the most important traits for the determination of an interaction. As a consequence, functional evenness and the variance of certain traits in the community were correlated to trophic complementarity between species, while trait identity, more than diversity, was related to network topology. The analysis was however limited by trait data availability, and a coarse resolution of certain taxonomic groups in our dataset. These limitations explain the importance of taxonomy, as well as the complexity of the statistical model needed. Our results outline the important implications of trait composition on ecological networks, opening promising avenues of research into the relationship between functional diversity and ecosystem functioning in multi-trophic systems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOikos
Volume127
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)316-326
Number of pages11
ISSN0030-1299
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

    Research areas

  • FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY, ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS, BIOTIC INTERACTIONS, ECOSYSTEM SERVICES, COMMUNITY ECOLOGY, TROPHIC LEVELS, PLANT, BIODIVERSITY, DYNAMICS, DISTURBANCE

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