Department of Economics and Business Economics

Marianne Simonsen

Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education

Research output: Working paperResearch

Standard

Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education. / Damm, Anna Piil; Larsen, Britt Østergaard; Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Simonsen, Marianne.

Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2017.

Research output: Working paperResearch

Harvard

APA

Damm, A. P., Larsen, B. Ø., Nielsen, H. S., & Simonsen, M. (2017). Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. Economics Working Papers, No. 2017-10

CBE

MLA

Damm, Anna Piil et al. Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. (Economics Working Papers; Journal number 2017-10). 2017., 66 p.

Vancouver

Author

Damm, Anna Piil ; Larsen, Britt Østergaard ; Nielsen, Helena Skyt ; Simonsen, Marianne. / Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education. Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2017. (Economics Working Papers; No. 2017-10).

Bibtex

@techreport{dbf04782242f49c39b127588d0299974,
title = "Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education",
abstract = "This paper exploits a Danish policy reform combined with population-wide administrative registers to investigate whether being above the minimum age of criminal responsibility deters juveniles from crime. We study young individuals’ tendency to commit crime as well as their likelihood of recidivism by exploiting police records on offenses committed by the population of children and youth, including those below the minimum age of criminal responsibility. The reform lowered the minimum age of criminal responsibility from 15 to 14 years. We find that the reform did not deter 14-year-olds from committing crime. Moreover, conditional on committing crime in the first place, youths affected by the lower minimum age of criminal responsibility were more likely to recidivate and less likely to be enrolled in the 9th grade, just as they have lower grades at the 9th grade exit exam, conditional on participating. The latter results are consistent with labeling effects of processing in the criminal justice system.",
keywords = "Juvenile delinquency, sanctions, general deterrence, individual deterrence, labeling effects",
author = "Damm, {Anna Piil} and Larsen, {Britt {\O}stergaard} and Nielsen, {Helena Skyt} and Marianne Simonsen",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "12",
language = "English",
publisher = "Institut for {\O}konomi, Aarhus Universitet",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "Institut for {\O}konomi, Aarhus Universitet",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education

AU - Damm,Anna Piil

AU - Larsen,Britt Østergaard

AU - Nielsen,Helena Skyt

AU - Simonsen,Marianne

PY - 2017/10/12

Y1 - 2017/10/12

N2 - This paper exploits a Danish policy reform combined with population-wide administrative registers to investigate whether being above the minimum age of criminal responsibility deters juveniles from crime. We study young individuals’ tendency to commit crime as well as their likelihood of recidivism by exploiting police records on offenses committed by the population of children and youth, including those below the minimum age of criminal responsibility. The reform lowered the minimum age of criminal responsibility from 15 to 14 years. We find that the reform did not deter 14-year-olds from committing crime. Moreover, conditional on committing crime in the first place, youths affected by the lower minimum age of criminal responsibility were more likely to recidivate and less likely to be enrolled in the 9th grade, just as they have lower grades at the 9th grade exit exam, conditional on participating. The latter results are consistent with labeling effects of processing in the criminal justice system.

AB - This paper exploits a Danish policy reform combined with population-wide administrative registers to investigate whether being above the minimum age of criminal responsibility deters juveniles from crime. We study young individuals’ tendency to commit crime as well as their likelihood of recidivism by exploiting police records on offenses committed by the population of children and youth, including those below the minimum age of criminal responsibility. The reform lowered the minimum age of criminal responsibility from 15 to 14 years. We find that the reform did not deter 14-year-olds from committing crime. Moreover, conditional on committing crime in the first place, youths affected by the lower minimum age of criminal responsibility were more likely to recidivate and less likely to be enrolled in the 9th grade, just as they have lower grades at the 9th grade exit exam, conditional on participating. The latter results are consistent with labeling effects of processing in the criminal justice system.

KW - Juvenile delinquency, sanctions, general deterrence, individual deterrence, labeling effects

M3 - Working paper

BT - Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility: Consequences for juvenile crime and education

PB - Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet

CY - Aarhus

ER -