Department of Economics and Business Economics

Marianne Simonsen

How Going to School Affects the Family

Research output: ResearchWorking paper

Standard

How Going to School Affects the Family. / Landersø, Rasmus; Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Simonsen, Marianne.

Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2017.

Research output: ResearchWorking paper

Harvard

Landersø, R, Nielsen, HS & Simonsen, M 2017 'How Going to School Affects the Family' Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus.

APA

Landersø, R., Nielsen, H. S., & Simonsen, M. (2017). How Going to School Affects the Family. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. Economics Working Papers, No. 2017-01

CBE

Landersø R, Nielsen HS, Simonsen M. 2017. How Going to School Affects the Family. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet.

MLA

Landersø, Rasmus, Helena Skyt Nielsen, and Marianne Simonsen How Going to School Affects the Family. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. (Economics Working Papers; Journal number 2017-01). 2017., 52 p.

Vancouver

Landersø R, Nielsen HS, Simonsen M. How Going to School Affects the Family. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. 2017 Oct.

Author

Landersø, Rasmus ; Nielsen, Helena Skyt ; Simonsen, Marianne. / How Going to School Affects the Family. Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2017. (Economics Working Papers; No. 2017-01).

Bibtex

@techreport{5c3586aa2a8f41f98f727dd8c281ad86,
title = "How Going to School Affects the Family",
abstract = "This paper investigates intra-family spillovers from the timing of school start on outcomes for the entire family. We first document how the timing of a child’s school start affects the timing of all subsequent transitions between tiers in the educational system. Exploiting quasi-random variation in school starting age induced by date of birth, we find that the timing of these transitions affect parental outcomes. At child age seven, for example, being one year older at school start increases maternal employment with four percentage points. At child age 15, similarly, being one year older at school start increases the likelihood the parents still cohabit or continue to be married with eight percentage points. Our results also indicate that focal child age at school start improves older siblings’ academic performance.",
keywords = "marital capital, marital dissolution, educational transition, regression discontinuity, spillover effects, marital capital, marital dissolution, educational transition, regression discontinuity, spillover effects",
author = "Rasmus Landersø and Nielsen, {Helena Skyt} and Marianne Simonsen",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
publisher = "Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - How Going to School Affects the Family

AU - Landersø,Rasmus

AU - Nielsen,Helena Skyt

AU - Simonsen,Marianne

PY - 2017/10

Y1 - 2017/10

N2 - This paper investigates intra-family spillovers from the timing of school start on outcomes for the entire family. We first document how the timing of a child’s school start affects the timing of all subsequent transitions between tiers in the educational system. Exploiting quasi-random variation in school starting age induced by date of birth, we find that the timing of these transitions affect parental outcomes. At child age seven, for example, being one year older at school start increases maternal employment with four percentage points. At child age 15, similarly, being one year older at school start increases the likelihood the parents still cohabit or continue to be married with eight percentage points. Our results also indicate that focal child age at school start improves older siblings’ academic performance.

AB - This paper investigates intra-family spillovers from the timing of school start on outcomes for the entire family. We first document how the timing of a child’s school start affects the timing of all subsequent transitions between tiers in the educational system. Exploiting quasi-random variation in school starting age induced by date of birth, we find that the timing of these transitions affect parental outcomes. At child age seven, for example, being one year older at school start increases maternal employment with four percentage points. At child age 15, similarly, being one year older at school start increases the likelihood the parents still cohabit or continue to be married with eight percentage points. Our results also indicate that focal child age at school start improves older siblings’ academic performance.

KW - marital capital, marital dissolution, educational transition, regression discontinuity, spillover effects

KW - marital capital, marital dissolution, educational transition, regression discontinuity, spillover effects

M3 - Working paper

BT - How Going to School Affects the Family

PB - Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet

ER -