Department of Economics and Business Economics

Marianne Simonsen

Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes. / Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Simonsen, Marianne.

In: Economics of Education Review, Vol. 45, 2015, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Kristoffersen, JHG, Krægpøth, M, Nielsen, HS & Simonsen, M 2015, 'Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes' Economics of Education Review, vol. 45, pp. 1-13. DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

APA

CBE

Kristoffersen JHG, Krægpøth M, Nielsen HS, Simonsen M. 2015. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes. Economics of Education Review. 45:1-13. Available from: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

MLA

Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G. et al."Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes". Economics of Education Review. 2015, 45. 1-13. Available: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

Vancouver

Kristoffersen JHG, Krægpøth M, Nielsen HS, Simonsen M. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes. Economics of Education Review. 2015;45:1-13. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

Author

Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G. ; Krægpøth, Morten ; Nielsen, Helena Skyt ; Simonsen, Marianne. / Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes. In: Economics of Education Review. 2015 ; Vol. 45. pp. 1-13

Bibtex

@article{9b84521c38b94069910dcea13b98f51e,
title = "Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes",
abstract = "This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic achievement of peers by about 1.7–2.3{\%} of a standard deviation.",
keywords = "Student mobility, Special educational needs, Education, Value added model",
author = "Kristoffersen, {Jannie H. G.} and Morten Kr{\ae}gp{\o}th and Nielsen, {Helena Skyt} and Marianne Simonsen",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Economics of Education Review",
issn = "0272-7757",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

AU - Kristoffersen,Jannie H. G.

AU - Krægpøth,Morten

AU - Nielsen,Helena Skyt

AU - Simonsen,Marianne

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic achievement of peers by about 1.7–2.3% of a standard deviation.

AB - This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic achievement of peers by about 1.7–2.3% of a standard deviation.

KW - Student mobility

KW - Special educational needs

KW - Education

KW - Value added model

U2 - 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

DO - 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.004

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Economics of Education Review

T2 - Economics of Education Review

JF - Economics of Education Review

SN - 0272-7757

ER -