Department of Political Science

Andreas Brøgger Albertsen

PhD, Assistant Professor

Andreas Brøgger Albertsen
See relations at Aarhus University

Profile


Three main research interests
Organ Scarcity: Can the family, state and the market end the suffering?
Every day people die waiting for an organ transplant, which could prolong their lives significantly. In light of this shortage several alternative strategies has been proposed for increasing the supply of organs. Should we consider people as donors by default, the limit the extent to which the family can veto which accounts for many organs not being utilized or introduce a market in organs? All proposals require careful ethical evaluation.

Luck Egalitarianism in Health
As new patterns of disease highlights the connection between individual lifestyle and poor health, the public debate on personal responsibility in health seems as relevant as ever.  But holding people responsible for their past choices in health is both complicated and controversial – not least because many unhealthy choices are predominantly made by those in the lower echelons of society. These questions are assessed from the perspective of luck egalitarianism, a prominent theory of distributive justice which is attentive to questions of personal responsibility.

Luck Egalitarianism
The normative debate about distributive justice is increasingly focused on the issue of personal responsibility. How does it affect our evaluation of a distribution if the differences between people reflect choices for which they are responsible? Luck egalitarians traditionally hold the view that we should not redistribute to eliminate such inequalities, but that those inequalities reflecting luck is the main concern for distributive justice.

I gladly supervise graduate students, who wish to write on issues related to:

  • Distributive Justice
  • Health care Prioritization/rationing
  • Organ shortage and possible solutions
  • Ethical aspects of economic incentives
  • Ethical aspects of market mechanisms
  • Medical Ethics

 

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