Obese Mice Fed a Diet Supplemented with Enzyme-Treated Wheat Bran Display Marked Shifts in the Liver Metabolome Concurrent with Altered Gut Bacteria

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

DOI

  • Dorothy A. Kieffer
    Dorothy A. KiefferUSDA ARS, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Obes & Metab Res Unit, Western Human Nutr Res Ctr
  • Brian D. Piccolo
    Brian D. PiccoloUniv Arkansas Med Sci, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas System, Dept Pediat
  • Maria L. Marco
    Maria L. MarcoUniv Calif Davis, University of California Davis, University of California System, Food Sci & Technol Dept
  • Eun Bae Kim
    Eun Bae KimKangwon Natl Univ, Kangwon National University, Coll Anim Life Sci, Dept Anim Life Sci
  • Michael L. Goodson
    Michael L. GoodsonUniv Calif Davis, University of California Davis, University of California System, Dept Microbiol
  • Michael J. Keenan
    Michael J. KeenanLouisiana State Univ, Louisiana State University, Louisiana State University System, AgCtr
  • Tamara N. Dunn
    Tamara N. DunnUSDA ARS, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Obes & Metab Res Unit, Western Human Nutr Res Ctr
  • Knud Erik Bach Knudsen
  • Sean H. Adams
    Sean H. AdamsUniv Arkansas Med Sci, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas System, Dept Pediat
  • Roy J. Martin
    Roy J. MartinUSDA ARS, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Obes & Metab Res Unit, Western Human Nutr Res Ctr
Background: Enzyme-treated wheat bran (ETWB) contains a fermentable dietary fiber previously shown to decrease liver triglycerides (TGs) and modify the gut microbiome in mice. It is not clear which mechanisms explain how ETWB feeding affects hepatic metabolism, but factors (i.e., xenometabolites) associated with specific microbes may be involved. Objective: The objective of this study was to characterize ETWB-driven shifts in the cecal microbiome and to identify correlates between microbial changes and diet-related differences in liver metabolism in diet-induced obese mice that typically display steatosis. Methods: Five-week-old male C57BL/6J mice fed a 45%-lard based fat diet supplemented with ETWB (20% wt:wt) or rapidly digestible starch (control) (n = 15/group) for 10 wk were characterized by using a multi-omics approach. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to identify variables that were strong discriminators between the ETWB and control groups. Results: Body weight and liver TGs were decreased by ETWB feeding (by 10% and 25%, respectively; P <0.001), and an index of liver reactive oxygen species was increased (by 29%, P <0.01). The cecal microbiome showed an increase in Bacteroidetes (by 42%; P <0.05) and a decrease in Firmicutes (by 16%; P <0.05). Metabolites that were strong discriminators between the ETWB and control groups included decreased liver antioxidants (glutathione and a-tocopherol); decreased liver carbohydrate metabolites, including glucose; lower hepatic arachidonic acid; and increased liver and plasma I3-hydroxybutyrate. Liver transcriptomics revealed key metabolic pathways affected by ETWB, especially those related to lipid metabolism and some fed- or fasting-regulated genes. Conclusions: Together, these changes indicate that dietary fibers such as ETWB regulate hepatic metabolism concurrently with specific gut bacteria community shifts in C57BL/6J mice. It is proposed that these changes may elicit gut-derived signals that reach the liver via enterohepatic circulation, ultimately affecting host liver metabolism in a manner that mimics, in part, the fasting state.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of Nutrition
Vol/bind146
Tidsskriftsnummer12
Sider (fra-til)2445-2460
Antal sider16
ISSN0022-3166
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2016

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