Coffee Drinking and Mortality in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

DOI

  • Marc J Gunter
    Marc J GunterInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.Frankrig
  • Neil Murphy
    Neil MurphyInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.Frankrig
  • Amanda J Cross
    Amanda J CrossDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Storbritannien
  • Laure Dossus
    Laure DossusInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.Frankrig
  • Laureen Dartois
    Laureen DartoisInstitut Gustave-RoussyFrankrig
  • Guy Fagherazzi
    Guy FagherazziInstitut Gustave-RoussyFrankrig
  • Rudolf Kaaks
    Rudolf KaaksDivision of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.Tyskland
  • Tilman Kühn
    Tilman KühnDivision of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.Tyskland
  • Heiner Boeing
    Heiner BoeingGerman Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke Tyskland
  • Krasimira Aleksandrova
    Krasimira AleksandrovaGerman Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke Tyskland
  • Anne Tjønneland
    Anne TjønnelandKræftens BekæmpelseDanmark
  • Anja Olsen
    Anja OlsenKræftens BekæmpelseDanmark
  • Kim Overvad
  • Sofus Christian Larsen
    Sofus Christian LarsenParker Instituttet, Frederiksberg HospitalDanmark
  • Maria Luisa Redondo Cornejo
    Maria Luisa Redondo CornejoPublic Health and Health Planning Directorate, Asturias, Spain.Spanien
  • Antonio Agudo
    Antonio AgudoUnit of Nutrition and Cancer.Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), 08908 Barcelona, Spain.Spanien
  • Maria-José Sánchez-Pérez
    Maria-José Sánchez-PérezEscuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs)Spanien
  • Jone M Altzibar
    Jone M AltzibarPublic Health Department of GipuzkoaSpanien
  • Carmen Navarro
    Carmen NavarroDepartment of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, E-30008 Murcia, Spain.Spanien
  • Eva Ardanaz
    Eva ArdanazEpidemiology, Prevention and Promotion Health Service, Institute of Public Health Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, SpainSpanien
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
    Kay-Tee KhawDepartment of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Strangeways Research Laboratory, Cambridge CB1 8RN, UK.Storbritannien
  • Adam S Butterworth
    Adam S ButterworthDepartment of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Strangeways Research Laboratory, Cambridge CB1 8RN, UK.Storbritannien
  • Kathryn E Bradbury
    Kathryn E BradburyNuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.Storbritannien
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
    Antonia TrichopoulouHellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.Grækenland
  • Pagona Lagiou
    Pagona LagiouDepartment of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.USA
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
    Dimitrios Trichopoulos
  • Domenico Palli
    Domenico PalliMolecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy.Italien
  • Sara Grioni
    Sara GrioniEpidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy.Italien
  • Paolo Vineis
    Paolo VineisDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Storbritannien
  • Salvatore Panico
    Salvatore PanicoDipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, Federico II University, Napoli, ItalyItalien
  • Rosario Tumino
    Rosario TuminoTumor Registry, Department of Preventive Medicine, Provincial Health Ragusa, ItalyItalien
  • Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
    Bas Bueno-de-MesquitaNational Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), BilthovenHolland
  • Peter Siersema
    Peter SiersemaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Holland
  • Max Leenders
    Max LeendersDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Holland
  • Joline W Beulens
    Joline W BeulensJulius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.Holland
  • Cuno U Uiterwaal
    Cuno U UiterwaalJulius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.Holland
  • Peter Wallström
    Peter WallströmDepartmental Office for Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, SwedenSverige
  • Lena Maria Nilsson
    Lena Maria NilssonDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå UniversitySverige
  • Rikard Landberg
    Rikard LandbergDepartment of Food Science, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.Sverige
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
    Elisabete WeiderpassUniversitetet i Tromsø, Norges Arktiske Universitet, Tromsø, NorwayNorge
  • Guri Skeie
    Guri SkeieUniversitetet i Tromsø, Norges Arktiske Universitet, Tromsø, NorwayNorge
  • Tonje Braaten
    Tonje BraatenUniversitetet i Tromsø, Norges Arktiske Universitet, Tromsø, NorwayNorge
  • Paul Brennan
    Paul BrennanInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.Frankrig
  • Idlir Licaj
    Idlir LicajUniversitetet i Tromsø, Norges Arktiske Universitet, Tromsø, NorwayNorge
  • David C Muller
    David C MullerDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Storbritannien
  • Rashmi Sinha
    Rashmi SinhaDivision of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, USA.USA
  • Nick Wareham
    Nick WarehamMRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.Storbritannien
  • Elio Riboli
    Elio RiboliDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Storbritannien

Background: The relationship between coffee consumption and mortality in diverse European populations with variable coffee preparation methods is unclear.

Objective: To examine whether coffee consumption is associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: 10 European countries.

Participants: 521 330 persons enrolled in EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition).

Measurements: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. The association of coffee consumption with serum biomarkers of liver function, inflammation, and metabolic health was evaluated in the EPIC Biomarkers subcohort (n = 14 800).

Results: During a mean follow-up of 16.4 years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Compared with nonconsumers, participants in the highest quartile of coffee consumption had statistically significantly lower all-cause mortality (men: HR, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.82 to 0.95]; P for trend < 0.001; women: HR, 0.93 [CI, 0.87 to 0.98]; P for trend = 0.009). Inverse associations were also observed for digestive disease mortality for men (HR, 0.41 [CI, 0.32 to 0.54]; P for trend < 0.001) and women (HR, 0.60 [CI, 0.46 to 0.78]; P for trend < 0.001). Among women, there was a statistically significant inverse association of coffee drinking with circulatory disease mortality (HR, 0.78 [CI, 0.68 to 0.90]; P for trend < 0.001) and cerebrovascular disease mortality (HR, 0.70 [CI, 0.55 to 0.90]; P for trend = 0.002) and a positive association with ovarian cancer mortality (HR, 1.31 [CI, 1.07 to 1.61]; P for trend = 0.015). In the EPIC Biomarkers subcohort, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower serum alkaline phosphatase; alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; γ-glutamyltransferase; and, in women, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a), and glycated hemoglobin levels.

Limitations: Reverse causality may have biased the findings; however, results did not differ after exclusion of participants who died within 8 years of baseline. Coffee-drinking habits were assessed only once.

Conclusion: Coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes. This relationship did not vary by country.

Primary Funding Source: European Commission Directorate-General for Health and Consumers and International Agency for Research on Cancer.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAnnals of Internal Medicine
Vol/bind167
Tidsskriftsnummer4
Sider (fra-til)236-247
Antal sider12
ISSN0003-4819
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15 aug. 2017

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