Production of reactive oxygen species from abraded silicates. Implications for the reactivity of the Martian soil

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

DOI

The results of the Labeled Release and the Gas Exchange experiments conducted on Mars by the Viking Landers show that compounds in the Martian soil can cause oxidation of organics and a release of oxygen in the presence of water. Several sources have been proposed for the oxidizing compounds, but none has been validated in situ and the cause of the observed oxidation has not been resolved. In this study, laboratory simulations of saltation were conducted to examine if and under which conditions wind abrasion of silicates, a process that is common on the Martian surface, can give rise to oxidants in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (center dot OH). We found that silicate samples abraded in simulated Martian atmospheres gave rise to a significant production of H2O2 and center dot OH upon contact with water. Our experiments demonstrated that abraded silicates could lead to a production of H(2)O(2)facilitated by atmospheric O-2 and inhibited by carbon dioxide. Furthermore, during simulated saltation the silicate particles became triboelectrically charged and at pressures similar to the Martian surface pressure we observed glow discharges. Electrical discharges can cause dissociation of CO2 and through subsequent reactions lead to a production of H2O2. These results indicate that the reactions linked to electrical discharges are the dominant source of H2O2 during saltation of silicates in a simulated Martian atmosphere, given the low pressure and the relatively high concentration of CO2. Our experiments provide evidence that wind driven abrasion could enhance the reactivity of the Martian soil and thereby could have contributed to the oxidation of organic compounds and the O-2 release observed in the Labeled Release and the Gas Exchange experiments. Furthermore, the release of H2O2 and.OH from abraded silicates could have a negative effect on the persistence of organic compounds in the Martian soil and the habitability of the Martian surface. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Vol/bind473
Sider (fra-til)113-121
Antal sider9
ISSN0012-821X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 sep. 2017

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