Low Anterior Resection Syndrome and Quality of Life After Sphincter-Sparing Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Long-term Longitudinal Follow-up

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    Emil H A Pieniowski, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden., Gabriella J Palmer, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.,
  • Therese Juul
  • Pernilla Lagergren, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden., Asif Johar, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.,
  • Katrine J Emmertsen
  • Caroline Nordenvall, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden., Mirna Abraham-Nordling, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

BACKGROUND: Despite low anterior resection syndrome being a well-known consequence of sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery, the long-term effect on bowel function and quality of life is not fully understood.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to elucidate whether symptoms of low anterior resection syndrome change over time and if the correlation to quality of life is equivalent when measured at 2 time points.

DESIGN: This prospective cohort study included measurements at 2 time points (5 years between; range, 7.1-16.1 years from surgery to second follow-up).

SETTINGS: This multicenter study included patients from Sweden and Denmark.

PATIENTS: Patients were included if they were ≥18 years of age and underwent curative rectal cancer surgery with either total or partial mesorectal excision.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcomes were measured with the low anterior resection syndrome questionnaire including a question assessing the impact of bowel function on quality of life and with the validated quality-of-life questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30.

RESULTS: In total, 282 patients were included and there were no statistically significant differences in the distribution among the 3 groups (no, minor, and major low anterior resection syndrome) when comparing time points follow-up 1 with follow-up 2 (p = 0.455). At follow-up 2, 138 patients (49%) still experienced major impairment. No both statistically and clinically significant differences were seen in the mean score of EORTC QLQ-C30 when comparing the same low anterior resection syndrome group at follow-up 1 and follow-up 2, and the impact on quality of life was comparable. Global health status/quality of life was impaired in the major low anterior resection syndrome group at both follow-up 1 (p < 0.001) and follow-up 2 (p < 0.001).

LIMITATIONS: The study design prevents an evaluation of causality.

CONCLUSIONS: Difficulties with low anterior resection syndrome and the impact on patients' quality of life persist over time. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A762.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Vol/bind62
Tidsskriftsnummer1
Sider (fra-til)14-20
Antal sider7
ISSN0012-3706
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2019

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